thecredo

Brown beats dead horse

In news, the labour party on April 5, 2010 at 11:43

The Financial Times reports on the latest volley from the Labour camp, surrounding the National Insurance rise.

Gordon Brown yesterday tried to draw a line under the row over his planned national insurance rise as he warned that £7bn of Tory cuts this year would derail the fragile recovery and create more unemployment.

The prime minister said the business leaders who opposed Labour’s national insurance rise in 2011 should be worried about how a Tory government would take demand out of the economy this year.

We don’t think Brown will be making many friends in big business too quickly.  His remarks on the 23 seem to indicate that perhaps they haven’t really considered their position.

That’s like telling Sir Alex Ferguson he doesn’t know anything about football, or telling Anne Robinson that she has no clue when it comes to being nasty and too personal.

Here’s what the Tories have to say:

Gordon Brown plans to increase Employer and Employee National Insurance contributions from April 2011. This tax on jobs will threaten the recovery, hurt working families and make unemployment worse. That’s why we have always made clear that of all Labour’s tax increases this was the one we most wanted to avoid. And on Monday I announced that we will be able to avoid the most damaging part of it. Seven out of ten working people will be better off than under Labour’s plans, and businesses will save £150 for almost every person they employ.

Labour haven’t really given a satisfactory answer to this, opting rather to sling mud at both the shadow Chancellor and Tory supporters – not the least of which are the 23.

That today they have chosen to once again seize the NI considerations, rather than more important matters such as the wider economy, education and health care, reveals just how bankrupt – if you’ll excuse the turn of phrase – the Labour campaign really is.

Read more about the 23 here, and the Financial Times story, here.

Gordon Brown plans to increase Employer and Employee National Insurance contributions from April 2011. This tax on jobs will threaten the recovery, hurt working families and make unemployment worse. That’s why we have always made clear that of all Labour’s tax increases this was the one we most wanted to avoid. And on Monday I announced that we will be able to avoid the most damaging part of it. Seven out of ten working people will be better off than under Labour’s plans, and businesses will save £150 for almost every person they employ.
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